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Tag Archives: DuPage County family law attorney

DuPage County family law attorneysToday’s world is, in many ways, more connected than ever before. Thanks to the rise of digital and online technology, it has never been easier to look for new employment or educational opportunities that may exist far from your current home. For some people, it is also relatively easy to pick up and move to a new city or state in search of a better life, but this is not the case for everyone. If you are divorced, separated, or unmarried and you and your child’s other parent share parental responsibilities, moving to a new area can be rather complicated.

How Far Is Too Far?

The Illinois Marriage and Dissolution of Marriage Act provides that any move that qualifies as a “relocation” must be approved by the court in advance. A relocation is any move by a parent with half or more of the parenting time with the child that exceeds a certain radius from the current home. If you currently live in Kane County—or Cook, DuPage, Lake, McHenry, or Will County—an in-state move of more than 25 miles is a relocation. If you currently live in any other county, a relocation is any in-state move of over 50 miles. Finally, if you live anywhere in Illinois and move more than 25 miles to a new out-of-state home, the move is considered a relocation.

Why Is Approval Needed?

The law requires you to obtain the court’s permission for a relocation to ensure that the rights of your child’s other parent are not being unduly compromised. The other parent—in most cases—has the right to reasonable parenting time with your child and the new geographical distance can present major challenges. Obtaining the court’s approval can be relatively easy if the other parent does not object to your proposed relocation. If you are able to negotiate a new parenting time plan that allows for a continued relationship between the other parent and your child, the move will likely be allowed to proceed. If the other parent does not agree and you still wish to pursue the relocation, you will need to convince the court that the move serves your child’s best interests.

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DuPage County family law attorneyFor most couples, a wedding is a culmination of months—if not years—of planning for a day that will mark the beginning of the rest of their life together. With a ceremony, reception, and honeymoon to put together, relatively few give much thought to a prenuptial agreement. However, as thousands of American divorcees would attest, developing such a contract with your soon-to-be spouse can safeguard your personal and financial well-being.

What is a Prenuptial Agreement?

A prenuptial agreement is a contract that a couple who are going to get married may create and sign prior to their wedding. The agreement typically specifies details how the couple will split their finances in the event of divorce. This includes the division of marital property, such as the house, bank accounts, and marital debt. If you or your spouse own a business, your agreement could also outline your plan for your interests should divorce become a reality. Prenuptial agreements can also be used for other considerations, such as the payment of spousal support and the payment of attorney's fees in the event of divorce.

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DuPage County family law attorneysIn most cases, children benefit greatly from having the financial and emotional support of both biological parents. Unfortunately, there are some cases in which one parent interferes with the time allocated to the other parent. If this denial is in direct violation of a court order, the parent that is missing out on time with their child has the right to seek enforcement through the court. If you are being denied parenting time with your child, the following information can help you determine what to do.

Visitation Interference is Considered a Crime in Illinois

If you took legal steps to receive legal parenting time with your child and your time is being interfered with (late drop-offs or returns, failure to show, etc.), then the denying or “interfering” parent is in contempt of a court order. This gives you certain legal rights, and it allows you to seek assistance from law enforcement and the family court for enforcement of the order. Unfortunately, these matters can be difficult to prove. Essentially, it is your word against the other parent's. For this reason, anyone who is being wrongfully denied parenting time should seek the assistance of an experienced family law attorney.

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DuPage County family law attorney, sexual offenses and child custodySexual offenses of a parent have significant consequences on their child visitation and custody rights. This is true even if an offense did not involve any harm to a child. Issues related to visitation and custody for a parent convicted of a sex offense may arise during or after divorce proceedings.

Limited Rights

A parent who has been convicted of a sexual offense faces limited rights when it comes to decision making, parenting time, and visitation of a child. In all cases, a child's best interests are always considered by the court.

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child support, child support in Illinois, child support modification, DuPage County family law attorney, Illinois case law

Child support in Illinois is computed as a percentage of a parent's net income. A parent must then pay a certain percentage depending on how many children he or she has to support. If a parent is ordered to pay child support based on a certain amount of income, and the parent's income subsequently changes, he or she can apply to the court for a modification to lower the ordered payment amount.

Generally, a parent who is ordered to pay child support cannot voluntarily quit his or her job to avoid paying support and then claim a substantial change in circumstances has occurred which requires a modification of their support obligation. Illinois case law takes this concept further and scrutinizes parents who are fired due to their own actions. Moreover, depending on the particular case, a court could find that someone who was fired was nonetheless voluntarily unemployed. If this happens, the court would classify the parent's loss of income as being in bad faith and thus no modification would be granted.

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St. Charles, IL 60174
630-665-7300
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From our law office in Wheaton, IL the family law and civil litigation law attorneys of Mirabella, Kincaid, Frederick and Mirabella, represent businesses and individual clients throughout the western suburbs of Chicago, Illinois including Wheaton, Naperville, Oak Brook, Glen Ellyn, Carol Stream, Lombard, Downers Grove, Burr Ridge, Lisle, Elmhurst, Oakbrook Terrace, Winfield, Woodridge, Warrenville and throughout DuPage, Kane and Kendall Counties.

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